Scott

First Look: Scott Addict RC

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We’ve been watching and waiting for the new Addict to drop, and it was well worth the wait!

While we haven’t been able to swing a leg over one yet, we’re really excited to get a few of the all-new Scott Addict RC rigs on the shop floor. Scott was looking to update one of the most succesful bikes on the planet over the past year, and they’ve timed their release to come just ahead of the 2019 Tour de France. One of the riders participating in this week’s Grand Tour, Simon Yates, gave the Addict it’s most famous win at the Vuetla a Espana in 2018.

At first look, what is most striking about the Addict is how many aspect of it’s sister bike, the Foil, its adopted. The Foil was Scott’s aero road bike, and its disctinctive integrated stem and bar shift over to make the Addict more aero as well. Those aerodynamic touches also tickle the top tube and downtube, with the forks looking just a bit more thick as well. That’s all apart of the mission to make the Addict even more well rounded, adding a new element to its reputation as one of lightest climbing bikes in the world.

And that aero touch hasn’t hurt its weight, either. The new frame is 14% more stiff than previous models. They didn’t add weight to the frame, and left no stone unturned in trying to save a few grams. Even the seat clamp gets an update, reducing the mechanism to just 12 grams and offering a secure closure that won’t stress your carbon frame.

One of the biggest changes and things we love about the new Addict doesn’t make the press sheet, but it’s not lost on us. Scott has always done a great job offering a wide range of models, but they’ve never done as good a job in offering options than with this model. There are a full DOZEN specifications to choose from, each with a different colorway and unique groupset and build. Any budget and any preference, there’s an Addict for you.

To learn more about the Scott Addict line-up, check out Scott’s info sheet or stop by to see us!

The Perfect Arcadia Grit & Gravel Bike Is...

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After a glorious day of racing at Mud, Sweat and Beers, plus a full day of embracing beer and tacos on Cinco de Mayo, it’s time to look at to the next big (and local) thing: Arcadia.

Arcadia Grit & Gravel offers up one of the most unique concepts in the state. The mountain bike race has relied on a route that’s like nothing else to provide both a fun experience and a killer challenge to racers of all abilities. To start, the race combines nearly 10 miles of pavement, gravel, and two-track, plus two key climbs, to sort riders out. An opening ascent two miles in and another long, grueling climb near the 8 mile mark serve as separators, but there is plenty of time to be gained in the sinuous, rolling pavement in between.

The reward for all that cranking is arguably the best singletrack in the state. The Arcadia trail system combines two loops of flowing, winding, exhilarating trail on either side of a lonely, quiet gravel road that splits the trail in two. Riders are often giggling throughout these two sections of trail, and the final two miles back to Arcadia and the finish are simply a blur. Throw in blooming trillium at the roadside and some sunny weather, and there’s hardly a more beautiful race on the calendar.

But that sharp divide in terrain gives some riders a bit of indecision. A gravel bike for the first half, and take your chances on the trail, or is is smarter to survive the paved surfaces and thrive in the singletrack? It’s a decision that’s heavily influenced by your level of confidence in bike handling. We take a look at two options, one with drop bars and one for our mountain bikers.

Giant Revolt 2. The ideal rig for giving it a go on the gravel. The Revolt 2 comes with a 2x drivetrain that offer up a wide range of gearing options for the steep opening ascent of Erdman Road, which sees pitches over 11% and much of it in loose sand. Alternatively, you’ll have a big gear for stomping away on the pavement and will be able to stretch the bunch on the long paved downhill. But what about the trail? Well, the Revolt fits up to 700 x 48 or 650 x 2.0 tires, so you can get some pretty wide rubber on there for more traction once you hit the singletrack. You can see all the Revolt options here.

Scott Scale RC. For the singletrack shredder, going with a feather light hardtail is the way to go at Arcadia. While the race is just about 50/50 between gravel and singletrack, most racers would argue that the most important part comes with the sharp right turn into the woods at the top of Taylor Road. The ascent of the longest climb in the race almost immediately tosses riders from wide open roads to tight, twisting, trillium-lined singletrack, and if you hit it tired, you can get gapped quick. That’s why riding your lightest hardtail is a really smart option. To survive the gravel and pavement, make sure you’re running a 32t or bigger chainring to avoid spinning out. Once into the trees, slap off your lockout and get shredding! Check out the full Scale family here.

Do you have any tips for riders taking on their first Arcadia Grit & Gravel? Let us know in the comments!